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TITLE 30ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
PART 1TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
CHAPTER 115CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
SUBCHAPTER ESOLVENT-USING PROCESSES
DIVISION 5CONTROL REQUIREMENTS FOR SURFACE COATING PROCESSES
RULE §115.450Applicability and Definitions

(a) Applicability. In the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston-Galveston-Brazoria areas, as defined in §115.10 of this title (relating to Definitions), the requirements in this division apply to the following surface coating processes, except as specified in paragraph (6) of this subsection:

  (1) large appliance surface coating;

  (2) metal furniture surface coating;

  (3) miscellaneous metal parts and products surface coating, miscellaneous plastic parts and products surface coating, pleasure craft surface coating, and automotive/transportation and business machine plastic parts surface coating at the original equipment manufacturer and off-site job shops that coat new parts and products or that re-coat used parts and products;

  (4) motor vehicle materials applied to miscellaneous metal and plastic parts specified in paragraph (3) of this subsection, at the original equipment manufacturer and off-site job shops that coat new metal and plastic parts or that re-coat used parts and products;

  (5) paper, film, and foil surface coating lines with the potential to emit from all coatings greater than or equal to 25 tons per year of volatile organic compounds (VOC) when uncontrolled; and

  (6) in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, automobile and light-duty truck assembly surface coating processes conducted by the original equipment manufacturer and operators that conduct automobile and light-duty truck surface coating processes under contract with the original equipment manufacturer.

(b) General definitions. Unless specifically defined in the Texas Clean Air Act (Texas Health and Safety Code, Chapter 382) or in §§3.2, 101.1, or 115.10 of this title (relating to Definitions), the terms in this division have the meanings commonly used in the field of air pollution control. In addition, the following meanings apply in this division unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

  (1) Aerosol coating (spray paint)--A hand-held, pressurized, non-refillable container that expels an adhesive or a coating in a finely divided spray when a valve on the container is depressed.

  (2) Air-dried coating--A coating that is cured at a temperature below 194 degrees Fahrenheit (90 degrees Celsius). These coatings may also be referred to as low-bake coatings.

  (3) Baked Coating--A coating that is cured at a temperature at or above 194 degrees Fahrenheit (90 degrees Celsius). These coatings may also be referred to as high-bake coatings.

  (4) Coating application system--Devices or equipment designed for the purpose of applying a coating material to a surface. The devices may include, but are not be limited to, brushes, sprayers, flow coaters, dip tanks, rollers, knife coaters, and extrusion coaters.

  (5) Coating line--An operation consisting of a series of one or more coating application systems and associated flash-off area(s), drying area(s), and oven(s) wherein a surface coating is applied, dried, or cured. The coating line ends at the point the coating is dried or cured, or prior to any subsequent application of a different coating.

  (6) Coating solids (or solids)--The part of a coating that remains on the substrate after the coating is dried or cured.

  (7) Daily weighted average--The total weight of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from all coatings subject to the same VOC limit in §115.453 of this title (relating to Control Requirements), divided by the total volume or weight of those coatings (minus water and exempt solvent), where applicable, or divided by the total volume or weight of solids, delivered to the application system on each coating line each day. Coatings subject to different VOC content limits in §115.453 of this title may not be combined for purposes of calculating the daily weighted average.

  (8) Multi-component coating--A coating that requires the addition of a separate reactive resin, commonly known as a catalyst or hardener, before application to form an acceptable dry film. These coatings may also be referred to as two-component coatings.

  (9) Normally closed container--A container that is closed unless an operator is actively engaged in activities such as adding or removing material.

  (10) One-component coating--A coating that is ready for application as it comes out of its container to form an acceptable dry film. A thinner, necessary to reduce the viscosity, is not considered a component.

  (11) Pounds of volatile organic compounds (VOC) per gallon of coating (minus water and exempt solvent)--The basis for content limits for surface coating processes that can be calculated by the following equation:

Attached Graphic

  (12) Pounds of volatile organic compounds (VOC) per gallon of solids--The basis for emission limits for surface coating processes that can be calculated by the following equation:

Attached Graphic

  (13) Spray gun--A device that atomizes a coating or other material and projects the particulates or other material onto a substrate.

  (14) Surface coating processes--Operations that use a coating application system.

(c) Specific surface coating definitions. The following meanings apply in this division unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

  (1) Automobile and light-duty truck manufacturing--The following definitions apply to this surface coating category.

    (A) Adhesive--Any chemical substance that is applied for the purpose of bonding two surfaces together other than by mechanical means.

    (B) Automobile and light-duty truck adhesive--An adhesive, including glass-bonding adhesive, used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and applied for the purpose of bonding two vehicle surfaces together without regard to the substrates involved.

    (C) Automobile and light-duty truck bedliner--A multi-component coating used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and applied to a cargo bed after the application of topcoat and outside of the topcoat operation to provide additional durability and chip resistance.

    (D) Automobile and light-duty truck cavity wax--A coating, used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process, applied into the cavities of the vehicle primarily for the purpose of enhancing corrosion protection.

    (E) Automobile and light-duty truck deadener--A coating used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and applied to selected vehicle surfaces primarily for the purpose of reducing the sound of road noise in the passenger compartment.

    (F) Automobile and light-duty truck gasket/gasket sealing material--A fluid used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and applied to coat a gasket or replace and perform the same function as a gasket. Automobile and light-duty truck gasket/gasket sealing material includes room temperature vulcanization seal material.

    (G) Automobile and light-duty truck glass-bonding primer--A primer, used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process, applied to windshield or other glass, or to body openings, to prepare the glass or body opening for the application of glass-bonding adhesives or the installation of adhesive-bonded glass. Automobile and light-duty truck glass-bonding primer includes glass-bonding/cleaning primers that perform both functions (cleaning and priming of the windshield or other glass, or body openings) prior to the application of an adhesive or the installation of adhesive-bonded glass.

    (H) Automobile and light-duty truck lubricating wax/compound--A protective lubricating material used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and applied to vehicle hubs and hinges.

    (I) Automobile and light-duty truck sealer--A high viscosity material used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and generally, but not always, applied in the paint shop after the body has received an electrodeposition primer coating and before the application of subsequent coatings (e.g., primer-surfacer). The primary purpose of automobile and light-duty truck sealer is to fill body joints completely so that there is no intrusion of water, gases, or corrosive materials into the passenger area of the body compartment. Such materials are also referred to as sealant, sealant primer, or caulk.

    (J) Automobile and light-duty truck trunk interior coating--A coating used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process outside of the primer-surfacer and topcoat operations and applied to the trunk interior to provide chip protection.

    (K) Automobile and light-duty truck underbody coating--A coating used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and applied to the undercarriage or firewall to prevent corrosion or provide chip protection.

    (L) Automobile and light-duty truck weather strip adhesive--An adhesive used in an automobile or light-duty truck assembly surface coating process and applied to weather-stripping materials for the purpose of bonding the weather-stripping material to the surface of the vehicle.

    (M) Automobile assembly surface coating process--The assembly-line coating of new passenger cars, or passenger car derivatives, capable of seating 12 or fewer passengers.

    (N) Electrodeposition primer--A process of applying a protective, corrosion-resistant waterborne primer on exterior and interior surfaces that provides thorough coverage of recessed areas. Electrodeposition primer is a dip-coating method that uses an electrical field to apply or deposit the conductive coating onto the part; the object being painted acts as an electrode that is oppositely charged from the particles of paint in the dip tank. Electrodeposition primer is also referred to as E-Coat, Uni-Prime, and ELPO Primer.

    (O) Final repair--The operation(s) performed and coating(s) applied to completely assembled motor vehicles or to parts that are not yet on a completely assembled vehicle to correct damage or imperfections in the coating. The curing of the coatings applied in these operations is accomplished at a lower temperature than that used for curing primer-surfacer and topcoat. This lower temperature cure avoids the need to send parts that are not yet on a completely assembled vehicle through the same type of curing process used for primer-surfacer and topcoat and is necessary to protect heat-sensitive components on completely assembled vehicles.

    (P) In-line repair--The operation(s) performed and coating(s) applied to correct damage or imperfections in the topcoat on parts that are not yet on a completely assembled vehicle. The curing of the coatings applied in these operations is accomplished at essentially the same temperature as that used for curing the previously applied topcoat. In-line repair is also referred to as high-bake repair or high-bake reprocess. In-line repair is considered part of the topcoat operation.

    (Q) Light-duty truck assembly surface coating process--The assembly-line coating of new motor vehicles rated at 8,500 pounds gross vehicle weight or less and designed primarily for the transportation of property, or derivatives such as pickups, vans, and window vans.

    (R) Primer-surfacer--An intermediate protective coating applied over the electrodeposition primer and under the topcoat. Primer-surfacer provides adhesion, protection, and appearance properties to the total finish. Primer-surfacer is also referred to as guide coat or surfacer. Primer-surfacer operations may include other coatings (e.g., anti-chip, lower-body anti-chip, chip-resistant edge primer, spot primer, blackout, deadener, interior color, basecoat replacement coating, etc.) that are applied in the same spray booth(s).

    (S) Topcoat--The final coating system applied to provide the final color or a protective finish. The topcoat may be a monocoat color or basecoat/clearcoat system. In-line repair and two-tone are part of topcoat. Topcoat operations may include other coatings (e.g., blackout, interior color, etc.) that are applied in the same spray booth(s).

    (T) Solids turnover ratio (RT')--The ratio of total volume of coating solids that is added to the electrodeposition primer system (EDP) in a calendar month divided by the total volume design capacity of the EDP system.

  (2) Automotive/transportation and business machine plastic parts--The following definitions apply to this surface coating category.

    (A) Adhesion prime--A coating that is applied to a polyolefin part to promote the adhesion of a subsequent coating. An adhesion prime is clearly identified as an adhesion prime or adhesion promoter on its accompanying material safety data sheet.

    (B) Automotive/transportation plastic parts--Interior and exterior plastic components of automobiles, trucks, tractors, lawnmowers, and other mobile equipment.

    (C) Black coating--A coating that has a maximum lightness of 23 units and a saturation less than 2.8, where saturation equals the square root of A2 + B2. These criteria are based on Cielab color space, 0/45 geometry. For spherical geometry, specular included, maximum lightness is 33 units.

Cont'd...

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